Harvesting Compost at the Huuuuuuuub!

Posted October 26, 2014 by corriegirl

Hi Friends,

One of my favorite things about living at the HUB is that I have learned about compost! I have even become the Compost Czar! And invented a song that is to be sung during the ritual (see post title). I thought I’d share some tips about how we do it here.

I love compost, because it enriches our soil and helps the garden. It’s also tremendously satisfying to make rich dirt out of kitchen scraps. And I’ve even enjoyed the dirty, stinky process of it, and the joy of finding squirmy worms through the work.

Compost Bin

We keep our bin close to the edge of the property, so it’s away from the hang-out area, but not so close to neighbors/the sidewalk that people can smell/complain about it

First, you build up the compost in the bin, by adding the good stuff! Any organic matter will do – but leave out any meat/animal products, or the rats will find it too tempting, and it will be smelly. You can store your compost in a bin in the freezer or on your counter. Add “browns” and sift with a pitchfork about once every few weeks or monthly, so that the greens/wet stuff mixes with the drier material. We use shredded newspaper for our browns, and also end up adding in a lot of coffee grounds and also occasional ash from fire parties.

We harvest about four times a year — early spring, mid-summer, late summer, and late fall. We are a building with six units/ten humans, so we use two compost bins. While one is “brewing,” we just let it hang, and add to the other one for awhile.

Or manually shift through into the wheelbarrowWe* made filtering boxes out of wood and something resembling chicken wire. You shovel the compost bits from the bin into the filter box over a wheelbarrow. You can either sit next to the set-up and manually sift the goods into the wheelbarrow. The idea is that the stuff that’s ready goes into the wheelbarrow, while the dirt that’s still too gooey and wet stays in the filter.

*To be fair, I had nothing to do with it! They were made before I joined the coop. 

You can make your own filter box

You have to wear overalls. And gloves.

You have to wear overalls.

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff will get tossed back into the pile

This still “green” stuff will get tossed back into the pile

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

The stuff that doesn’t make it through the filter that’s too clumpy and wet, I toss in a pile on a tarp or large plastic garbage bag. After distributing the good stuff into the garden, I mix that overly “green” compost back in the bin with more browns.

 

Inevitably, some garbage ends up in the pile. Our most common non-compostables we fish out are produce stickers (remember to pull them off right when you bring them home from the store) and the stray credit cards that made it through the shredder with the newspapers used as browns. Some tea bags don’t compost as well, so you can open them up and just put the innards back in. And there’s the occasional small toy or spoon that finds its way in there…

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

Once you’ve got your good mix into the wheelbarrow, you then get to shovel it into and spread it around the garden! Yum, your garden instantly looks fresh and rich, and the worms get to work enriching the soil to make yummier veggies and prettier flowers.

As I like to say, enjoy your homemade dirt, you hippies!

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Harvesting Compost at the Huuuuuuuub!

Posted October 26, 2014 by corriegirl

Hi Friends,

One of my favorite things about living at the HUB is that I have learned about compost! I have even become the Compost Czar! And invented a song that is to be sung during the ritual (see post title). I thought I’d share some tips about how we do it here.

I love compost, because it enriches our soil and helps the garden. It’s also tremendously satisfying to make rich dirt out of kitchen scraps. And I’ve even enjoyed the dirty, stinky process of it, and the joy of finding squirmy worms through the work.

Compost Bin

We keep our bin close to the edge of the property, so it’s away from the hang-out area, but not so close to neighbors/the sidewalk that people can smell/complain about it

First, you build up the compost in the bin, by adding the good stuff! Any organic matter will do – but leave out any meat/animal products, or the rats will find it too tempting, and it will be smelly. You can store your compost in a bin in the freezer or on your counter. Add “browns” and sift with a pitchfork about once every few weeks or monthly, so that the greens/wet stuff mixes with the drier material. We use shredded newspaper for our browns, and also end up adding in a lot of coffee grounds and also occasional ash from fire parties.

We harvest about four times a year — early spring, mid-summer, late summer, and late fall. We are a building with six units/ten humans, so we use two compost bins. While one is “brewing,” we just let it hang, and add to the other one for awhile.

Or manually shift through into the wheelbarrowWe* made filtering boxes out of wood and something resembling chicken wire. You shovel the compost bits from the bin into the filter box over a wheelbarrow. You can either sit next to the set-up and manually sift the goods into the wheelbarrow. The idea is that the stuff that’s ready goes into the wheelbarrow, while the dirt that’s still too gooey and wet stays in the filter.

*To be fair, I had nothing to do with it! They were made before I joined the coop. 

You can make your own filter box

You have to wear overalls. And gloves.

You have to wear overalls.

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff will get tossed back into the pile

This still “green” stuff will get tossed back into the pile

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

The stuff that doesn’t make it through the filter that’s too clumpy and wet, I toss in a pile on a tarp or large plastic garbage bag. After distributing the good stuff into the garden, I mix that overly “green” compost back in the bin with more browns.

 

Inevitably, some garbage ends up in the pile. Our most common non-compostables we fish out are produce stickers (remember to pull them off right when you bring them home from the store) and the stray credit cards that made it through the shredder with the newspapers used as browns. Some tea bags don’t compost as well, so you can open them up and just put the innards back in. And there’s the occasional small toy or spoon that finds its way in there…

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

Once you’ve got your good mix into the wheelbarrow, you then get to shovel it into and spread it around the garden! Yum, your garden instantly looks fresh and rich, and the worms get to work enriching the soil to make yummier veggies and prettier flowers.

As I like to say, enjoy your homemade dirt, you hippies!

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Harvesting Compost at the Huuuuuuuub!

Posted October 26, 2014 by corriegirl

Hi Friends,

One of my favorite things about living at the HUB is that I have learned about compost! I have even become the Compost Czar! And invented a song that is to be sung during the ritual (see post title). I thought I’d share some tips about how we do it here.

I love compost, because it enriches our soil and helps the garden. It’s also tremendously satisfying to make rich dirt out of kitchen scraps. And I’ve even enjoyed the dirty, stinky process of it, and the joy of finding squirmy worms through the work.

Compost Bin

We keep our bin close to the edge of the property, so it’s away from the hang-out area, but not so close to neighbors/the sidewalk that people can smell/complain about it

First, you build up the compost in the bin, by adding the good stuff! Any organic matter will do – but leave out any meat/animal products, or the rats will find it too tempting, and it will be smelly. You can store your compost in a bin in the freezer or on your counter. Add “browns” and sift with a pitchfork about once every few weeks or monthly, so that the greens/wet stuff mixes with the drier material. We use shredded newspaper for our browns, and also end up adding in a lot of coffee grounds and also occasional ash from fire parties.

We harvest about four times a year — early spring, mid-summer, late summer, and late fall. We are a building with six units/ten humans, so we use two compost bins. While one is “brewing,” we just let it hang, and add to the other one for awhile.

Or manually shift through into the wheelbarrowWe* made filtering boxes out of wood and something resembling chicken wire. You shovel the compost bits from the bin into the filter box over a wheelbarrow. You can either sit next to the set-up and manually sift the goods into the wheelbarrow. The idea is that the stuff that’s ready goes into the wheelbarrow, while the dirt that’s still too gooey and wet stays in the filter.

*To be fair, I had nothing to do with it! They were made before I joined the coop. 

You can make your own filter box

You have to wear overalls. And gloves.

You have to wear overalls.

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff will get tossed back into the pile

This still “green” stuff will get tossed back into the pile

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

The stuff that doesn’t make it through the filter that’s too clumpy and wet, I toss in a pile on a tarp or large plastic garbage bag. After distributing the good stuff into the garden, I mix that overly “green” compost back in the bin with more browns.

 

Inevitably, some garbage ends up in the pile. Our most common non-compostables we fish out are produce stickers (remember to pull them off right when you bring them home from the store) and the stray credit cards that made it through the shredder with the newspapers used as browns. Some tea bags don’t compost as well, so you can open them up and just put the innards back in. And there’s the occasional small toy or spoon that finds its way in there…

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

Once you’ve got your good mix into the wheelbarrow, you then get to shovel it into and spread it around the garden! Yum, your garden instantly looks fresh and rich, and the worms get to work enriching the soil to make yummier veggies and prettier flowers.

As I like to say, enjoy your homemade dirt, you hippies!

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Harvesting Compost at the Huuuuuuuub!

Posted October 26, 2014 by corriegirl

Hi Friends,

One of my favorite things about living at the HUB is that I have learned about compost! I have even become the Compost Czar! And invented a song that is to be sung during the ritual (see post title). I thought I’d share some tips about how we do it here.

I love compost, because it enriches our soil and helps the garden. It’s also tremendously satisfying to make rich dirt out of kitchen scraps. And I’ve even enjoyed the dirty, stinky process of it, and the joy of finding squirmy worms through the work.

Compost Bin

We keep our bin close to the edge of the property, so it’s away from the hang-out area, but not so close to neighbors/the sidewalk that people can smell/complain about it

First, you build up the compost in the bin, by adding the good stuff! Any organic matter will do – but leave out any meat/animal products, or the rats will find it too tempting, and it will be smelly. You can store your compost in a bin in the freezer or on your counter. Add “browns” and sift with a pitchfork about once every few weeks or monthly, so that the greens/wet stuff mixes with the drier material. We use shredded newspaper for our browns, and also end up adding in a lot of coffee grounds and also occasional ash from fire parties.

We harvest about four times a year — early spring, mid-summer, late summer, and late fall. We are a building with six units/ten humans, so we use two compost bins. While one is “brewing,” we just let it hang, and add to the other one for awhile.

Or manually shift through into the wheelbarrowWe* made filtering boxes out of wood and something resembling chicken wire. You shovel the compost bits from the bin into the filter box over a wheelbarrow. You can either sit next to the set-up and manually sift the goods into the wheelbarrow. The idea is that the stuff that’s ready goes into the wheelbarrow, while the dirt that’s still too gooey and wet stays in the filter.

*To be fair, I had nothing to do with it! They were made before I joined the coop. 

You can make your own filter box

You have to wear overalls. And gloves.

You have to wear overalls.

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff will get tossed back into the pile

This still “green” stuff will get tossed back into the pile

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

The stuff that doesn’t make it through the filter that’s too clumpy and wet, I toss in a pile on a tarp or large plastic garbage bag. After distributing the good stuff into the garden, I mix that overly “green” compost back in the bin with more browns.

 

Inevitably, some garbage ends up in the pile. Our most common non-compostables we fish out are produce stickers (remember to pull them off right when you bring them home from the store) and the stray credit cards that made it through the shredder with the newspapers used as browns. Some tea bags don’t compost as well, so you can open them up and just put the innards back in. And there’s the occasional small toy or spoon that finds its way in there…

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

Once you’ve got your good mix into the wheelbarrow, you then get to shovel it into and spread it around the garden! Yum, your garden instantly looks fresh and rich, and the worms get to work enriching the soil to make yummier veggies and prettier flowers.

As I like to say, enjoy your homemade dirt, you hippies!

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Harvesting Compost at the Huuuuuuuub!

Posted October 26, 2014 by corriegirl

Hi Friends,

One of my favorite things about living at the HUB is that I have learned about compost! I have even become the Compost Czar! And invented a song that is to be sung during the ritual (see post title). I thought I’d share some tips about how we do it here.

I love compost, because it enriches our soil and helps the garden. It’s also tremendously satisfying to make rich dirt out of kitchen scraps. And I’ve even enjoyed the dirty, stinky process of it, and the joy of finding squirmy worms through the work.

Compost Bin

We keep our bin close to the edge of the property, so it’s away from the hang-out area, but not so close to neighbors/the sidewalk that people can smell/complain about it

First, you build up the compost in the bin, by adding the good stuff! Any organic matter will do – but leave out any meat/animal products, or the rats will find it too tempting, and it will be smelly. You can store your compost in a bin in the freezer or on your counter. Add “browns” and sift with a pitchfork about once every few weeks or monthly, so that the greens/wet stuff mixes with the drier material. We use shredded newspaper for our browns, and also end up adding in a lot of coffee grounds and also occasional ash from fire parties.

We harvest about four times a year — early spring, mid-summer, late summer, and late fall. We are a building with six units/ten humans, so we use two compost bins. While one is “brewing,” we just let it hang, and add to the other one for awhile.

Or manually shift through into the wheelbarrowWe* made filtering boxes out of wood and something resembling chicken wire. You shovel the compost bits from the bin into the filter box over a wheelbarrow. You can either sit next to the set-up and manually sift the goods into the wheelbarrow. The idea is that the stuff that’s ready goes into the wheelbarrow, while the dirt that’s still too gooey and wet stays in the filter.

*To be fair, I had nothing to do with it! They were made before I joined the coop. 

You can make your own filter box

You have to wear overalls. And gloves.

You have to wear overalls.

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff will get tossed back into the pile

This still “green” stuff will get tossed back into the pile

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

One thing you have to do is filter out the garbage from the compost

The stuff that doesn’t make it through the filter that’s too clumpy and wet, I toss in a pile on a tarp or large plastic garbage bag. After distributing the good stuff into the garden, I mix that overly “green” compost back in the bin with more browns.

 

Inevitably, some garbage ends up in the pile. Our most common non-compostables we fish out are produce stickers (remember to pull them off right when you bring them home from the store) and the stray credit cards that made it through the shredder with the newspapers used as browns. Some tea bags don’t compost as well, so you can open them up and just put the innards back in. And there’s the occasional small toy or spoon that finds its way in there…

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

The best part is distributing the final product into the garden!

Once you’ve got your good mix into the wheelbarrow, you then get to shovel it into and spread it around the garden! Yum, your garden instantly looks fresh and rich, and the worms get to work enriching the soil to make yummier veggies and prettier flowers.

As I like to say, enjoy your homemade dirt, you hippies!

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Logan Square Cooperative Annual Open House

Posted August 29, 2014 by marksmithivas

Our cooperative’s annual open house is Sunday September 7th. We invite anyone interested in learning more about cooperative living, and/or starting your own housing co-op.

More info and to RSVP, please visit:

https://actionnetwork.org/events/logan-square-cooperative-annual-open-house


Sunny 1-bedroom unit for sale

Posted June 30, 2014 by nmcnulty

Sunny 1-bedroom available in the HUB housing cooperative in Little Village

The HUB Co-op is a member-owned housing cooperative on Marshall Boulevard. We’re an intentional community, and we value cooperation, fun, responsibility, and openness.

NEW! Check out our listing on ForSaleByOwner.com: tinyurl.com/HUBCoop123

  • Huge windows throughout
  • Eat-in kitchen looks out onto green courtyard

R2 photo kitchn

  • Laundry and wi-fi included
  • Recently renovated

R2 photo long shot

  • Vegetable and flower garden, common courtyard, storage space
  • Woodworking shop and bike workshop for member use
  • Convenient to shopping, public transportation and parks
  • Dogs and cats welcome!
  • Kid friendly!

The unit is approximately 950 square feet, with hard-wood floors, enormous windows, and ten foot ceilings. Appliances such as a gas stove, refrigerator, and microwave are included. New furnace.

Members share a common courtyard for gardening, grilling, and hanging out. The basement has storage space, laundry, and communal workspace. A partial green roof, composting, and a garden are a few of our projects. Hopefully chickens to come in 2015!

The HUB Coop is close to schools, parks, the Pink line, several bus routes & good bike routes. Marshall Boulevard is a beautiful grassy and treelined street with a protected bike lane and a proposed Divvy Station.

Asking $8,000 buy-in (negotiable–make us an offer!). The HUB provides financing. A monthly payment covers your part of the mortgage and the co-op’s carrying charge. For this unit, the mortgage and the carrying charge totals approximately $975 right now. (Membership decides budgeting and financial issues.) This monthly fee pays for most costs of ownership, including property tax, building insurance, repairs, projects, common utilities and adding to the reserve.  There are also a couple of additional charges that are per person -– gas for hot water and wifi. So the total depends on the number of residents. Remember, you’re an owner, so you can deduct your share of the mortgage interest and property tax.

 

HUB photo garden

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Sunny 1-bedroom unit for sale

Posted June 30, 2014 by nmcnulty

Sunny 1-bedroom available in the HUB housing cooperative in Little Village

The HUB Co-op is a member-owned housing cooperative on Marshall Boulevard. We’re an intentional community, and we value cooperation, fun, responsibility, and openness.

NEW! Check out our listing on ForSaleByOwner.com: tinyurl.com/HUBCoop123

  • Huge windows throughout
  • Eat-in kitchen looks out onto green courtyard

R2 photo kitchn

  • Laundry and wi-fi included
  • Recently renovated

R2 photo long shot

  • Vegetable and flower garden, common courtyard, storage space
  • Woodworking shop and bike workshop for member use
  • Convenient to shopping, public transportation and parks
  • Dogs and cats welcome!
  • Kid friendly!

The unit is approximately 950 square feet, with hard-wood floors, enormous windows, and ten foot ceilings. Appliances such as a gas stove, refrigerator, and microwave are included. New furnace.

Members share a common courtyard for gardening, grilling, and hanging out. The basement has storage space, laundry, and communal workspace. A partial green roof, composting, and a garden are a few of our projects. Hopefully chickens to come in 2015!

The HUB Coop is close to schools, parks, the Pink line, several bus routes & good bike routes. Marshall Boulevard is a beautiful grassy and treelined street with a protected bike lane and a proposed Divvy Station.

Asking $8,000 buy-in (negotiable–make us an offer!). The HUB provides financing. A monthly payment covers your part of the mortgage and the co-op’s carrying charge. For this unit, the mortgage and the carrying charge totals approximately $975 right now. (Membership decides budgeting and financial issues.) This monthly fee pays for most costs of ownership, including property tax, building insurance, repairs, projects, common utilities and adding to the reserve.  There are also a couple of additional charges that are per person -– gas for hot water and wifi. So the total depends on the number of residents. Remember, you’re an owner, so you can deduct your share of the mortgage interest and property tax.

 

HUB photo garden

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Sunny 1-bedroom unit for sale

Posted June 30, 2014 by nmcnulty

Sunny 1-bedroom available in the HUB housing cooperative in Little Village

The HUB Co-op is a member-owned housing cooperative on Marshall Boulevard. We’re an intentional community, and we value cooperation, fun, responsibility, and openness.

NEW! Check out our listing on ForSaleByOwner.com: tinyurl.com/HUBCoop123

  • Huge windows throughout
  • Eat-in kitchen looks out onto green courtyard

R2 photo kitchn

  • Laundry and wi-fi included
  • Recently renovated

R2 photo long shot

  • Vegetable and flower garden, common courtyard, storage space
  • Woodworking shop and bike workshop for member use
  • Convenient to shopping, public transportation and parks
  • Dogs and cats welcome!
  • Kid friendly!

The unit is approximately 950 square feet, with hard-wood floors, enormous windows, and ten foot ceilings. Appliances such as a gas stove, refrigerator, and microwave are included. New furnace.

Members share a common courtyard for gardening, grilling, and hanging out. The basement has storage space, laundry, and communal workspace. A partial green roof, composting, and a garden are a few of our projects. Hopefully chickens to come in 2015!

The HUB Coop is close to schools, parks, the Pink line, several bus routes & good bike routes. Marshall Boulevard is a beautiful grassy and treelined street with a protected bike lane and a proposed Divvy Station.

Asking $8,000 buy-in (negotiable–make us an offer!). The HUB provides financing. A monthly payment covers your part of the mortgage and the co-op’s carrying charge. For this unit, the mortgage and the carrying charge totals approximately $975 right now. (Membership decides budgeting and financial issues.) This monthly fee pays for most costs of ownership, including property tax, building insurance, repairs, projects, common utilities and adding to the reserve.  There are also a couple of additional charges that are per person -– gas for hot water and wifi. So the total depends on the number of residents. Remember, you’re an owner, so you can deduct your share of the mortgage interest and property tax.

 

HUB photo garden

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative


Sunny 1-bedroom unit for sale

Posted June 30, 2014 by nmcnulty

Sunny 1-bedroom available in the HUB housing cooperative in Little Village

The HUB Co-op is a member-owned housing cooperative on Marshall Boulevard. We’re an intentional community, and we value cooperation, fun, responsibility, and openness.

NEW! Check out our listing on ForSaleByOwner.com: tinyurl.com/HUBCoop123

  • Huge windows throughout
  • Eat-in kitchen looks out onto green courtyard

R2 photo kitchn

  • Laundry and wi-fi included
  • Recently renovated

R2 photo long shot

  • Vegetable and flower garden, common courtyard, storage space
  • Woodworking shop and bike workshop for member use
  • Convenient to shopping, public transportation and parks
  • Dogs and cats welcome!
  • Kid friendly!

The unit is approximately 950 square feet, with hard-wood floors, enormous windows, and ten foot ceilings. Appliances such as a gas stove, refrigerator, and microwave are included. New furnace.

Members share a common courtyard for gardening, grilling, and hanging out. The basement has storage space, laundry, and communal workspace. A partial green roof, composting, and a garden are a few of our projects. Hopefully chickens to come in 2015!

The HUB Coop is close to schools, parks, the Pink line, several bus routes & good bike routes. Marshall Boulevard is a beautiful grassy and treelined street with a protected bike lane and a proposed Divvy Station.

Asking $8,000 buy-in (negotiable–make us an offer!). The HUB provides financing. A monthly payment covers your part of the mortgage and the co-op’s carrying charge. For this unit, the mortgage and the carrying charge totals approximately $975 right now. (Membership decides budgeting and financial issues.) This monthly fee pays for most costs of ownership, including property tax, building insurance, repairs, projects, common utilities and adding to the reserve.  There are also a couple of additional charges that are per person -– gas for hot water and wifi. So the total depends on the number of residents. Remember, you’re an owner, so you can deduct your share of the mortgage interest and property tax.

 

HUB photo garden

Syndicated from HUB Housing Cooperative